Academics

Curriculum

With a Groton education, you will think critically, speak and write clearly, reason quantitatively, and learn to understand the experiences of others.
You will better understand the world today through the study of ancient civilizations. You will benefit from the STEM approaches infused throughout math and science classes. And you will nourish your intellect with time-tested fundamentals, such as Latin.

Even more than that—you will learn to distinguish the germane from the trivial and right from wrong. As a Groton student, you will analyze, problem-solve, and leave the 优德娱乐场 prepared for, in the words of school founder Endicott Peabody, “the active work of life.”

Course Departments

List of 2 items.

  • Second and Third Formers

    Eighth and ninth graders (Second and Third Formers) are immersed in the basic disciplines. At least two years of a classical language, Latin or Greek, are required, which helps students analyze carefully and synthesize information—foundational skills that you will find useful in every class.
  • Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Formers

    Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth graders (Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Formers) have room for electives. Besides numerous math, science, and computer science alternatives, electives might include history courses, such as Power and Politics: Dictators and Democrats, or Tigers, Elephants, and Cell Phones: Modern India. You might opt for an English elective on Jane Austen, or Literature of Resistance and Resilience, or Reading Film. Want to study a topic that’s not offered? Groton students can plan one-on-one tutorials with faculty in subjects of their choice.
To build your strong foundation for future learning, Groton requires the following:

Second Form (8th Grade)

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • French, Spanish, or Chinese
  • Latin
  • Science
  • Arts

Third Form (9th grade)

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • French, Spanish, or Chinese
  • Cellular/Organismic Biology or Ecology
  • Latin or (with permission) Greek
  • Sacred Texts and Ancient Peoples
  • Arts (a one-half credit course in shop, music, or studio art)

Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Forms (10th, 11th, and 12th grades)

  • English through Expository Writing (taken in fall of Sixth Form)
  • Mathematics through trigonometry (the first term of precalculus) or through Fifth Form, whichever comes later
  • A world language through level three or Fifth Form, whichever comes later
  • World and the West, U.S. History
  • A year of lab science
  • Ethics or another option in the Religious Studies and Philosophy Department, and for those who enter in Upper School, a one-term Comparative Religion course
  • Three credits of arts in Upper School
Many courses prepare students for Advanced Placement exams, including some not designated AP.